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Mary Carol Koester / Azalea Bindery, LLC
HAND–CRAFTED BOOKS, ALBUMS & BOXES TO CELEBRATE BIRTHS, GRADUATIONS, WEDDINGS, ANNIVERSARIES, AND OTHER SPECIAL OCCASIONS   My hand-crafted books, albums, and boxes...

 

inside Studio 375, 375 Depot St.
Asheville, NC 28801
828-707-4553

Brandy Clements

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Planet Art

Media: Mixed Media

 Brandy Clements & Hobie’s Porch Chair Caning,

NOW OFFERING CHAIR CANING CLASSES in our studio in the River Arts District!          

Visit http://gochairrepair.com/workshops/ 

A family tradition since 1890:  Chair Caning is in my blood…I am a 4th generation chair caner, a skill passed down through the women in my family. Hobie is both my grandpa and my dad. Grandma Ida learned caning from her mother. My Aunt Linda upheld the tradition & taught me cane, rush, & splint weaves at Chair Repair Boot Camp in 2005. 

When I returned to Charleston, I got my first job rushing 30+ chairs for Kasper’s Diner & began working with local furniture companies.  I worked on amazing antiques, including a 1940’s wheelchair, & I also fixed the chairs in the 5 star Charleston Place Hotel’s Palmetto Café

Since moving to Asheville, I’ve worked with individual clients & furniture repair shops.  I was honored to be Artist in Residence at the Grove Arcade Arts & Heritage Gallery in 2008.  This wonderful opportunity inspired me to move beyond repairs to creating vibrantly dyed splint weaves, & learning new ways of weaving cane.  

Hobie’s Porch Chair Caning soon got too big for my porch and my house, and now resides on Planet Art in the River Arts District, where I do both caning & picture framing.  By fixing (saving!) an old chair, we are preserving a piece of history & conserving valuable resources in a disposable world.  I love the before & after shots of chairs I’ve saved from a dusty boring attic corner.  I am genuinely proud to continue the tradition by offering chair caning classes in my studio, new in 2012!

Brandy Clements                                                   



 Brandy Clements & Hobie’s Porch Chair Caning,

A family tradition since 1890.

 My grandparents lived in an old school house on a hill outside of Charlottesville, Va.  Though she died when I was only 2, Grandma Ida has taught me a lot.  I learned that you could be good at a lot of things (you don’t have to do what “they” say & pick one thing & do it).  But most importantly, she taught me that you can make art both your passion & your livelihood.

Ida learned caning from her mother Gladys McInnes Allen. My aunt Linda really upheld the tradition & taught me cane, rush, & splint weaves at Chair Repair Boot Camp in 2005.  When I returned to Charleston, I got my first job rushing & painting 30+ chairs for Kasper’s Diner & began working with local furniture companies.  I worked on some amazing antiques, including a 1940’s FDR style wheelchair, & I also fixed the cane chairs in the 5 star Charleston Place Hotel’s Palmetto Café.  I was featured in a show at Studio Open on Folly Beach & participated in a benefit for the Surfrider Foundation.  

Living at the beach was fun & the historical city offered many challenging & beautiful caning projects, but I’ve always been drawn to the North Carolina mountains. The Blue Ridge Mountain culture makes my soul feel at peace. Since moving to Asheville in 2007, I’ve worked with individual clients & several furniture repair shops.  I was honored to be the Artist in Residence at the Grove Arcade Arts & Heritage Gallery in 2008.  This wonderful opportunity was the inspiration to move my craft beyond repairs to creating vibrantly dyed splint weaves, & learning new ways of weaving cane.  Most recently I was accepted to the Southern Highlands Craft Guild!

Now I live on Planet Art in the River Arts Galaxy, where I do both caning & picture framing.  By fixing (saving!) an old chair, we are preserving a piece of history & conserving valuable resources in a disposable world.  I love the before & after shots of chairs I’ve saved from a dusty boring attic corner.  People ask me how long it takes to learn chair caning, & I tell them…”I’m still learning: No chair is ever the same & there is always a minute detail that makes me think differently or challenges me when I think it’ll be an easy job.” The more people I meet who are surprised & impressed with my caning, the more I am genuinely proud to continue the tradition.  I feel like an artist & a historian.  Every chair has a story to tell & every person that calls tells me that story.  Chair caning helps me be totally in the moment, yet connected with the past, & keeping the tradition alive for future generations.  Thanks for reading!

Brandy Clements