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Amy Goldstein-Rice

Clay Sculpture

Tryon, NC

The imagery of animals had its beginnings with the birth of my son (Ryan). It was during those early years, that our house was filled with pull toys and spinning tops. We (Frank and I) put down the classic to read the nonsensical stories of Dr. Seuss. We discovered the animated world of "Where the Wild Things Go". I was immersed in the wee world of children.

That was the turning point, from the decorative vessel to the narrative forms. I began to interweave folktales and animal imagery from the Native American myths. I choose certain animals, such as birds, wolves, bugs and domestic cats and dogs because of my interaction with or ideas about them. I searched for a human connection: the vulnerability of the rabbit, the since of family within the wolf pack and the basic needs of any mammal to survive.

~ The animal becomes a talisman that represented or told a story of some little obsessions, ideas or concerns.

As my work continues to evolve, I keep my sights on the storyline using various animals and human forms.

  • bunny sculpture holding a flower with grace drawn on the back

    “A Gift from Grace” – Bunny Sculpture

    $90.00
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  • whimsical clay sculpture, figurative clay sculpture, clay for the wall, clay wall art, folk art center

    “Angelfish” Ceramic Wall Sculpture

    $77.00
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  • black and white rabbit sculpture

    “Butterfly Rabbit” – Sculptural Vase

    $158.00
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  • handmade ceramic bunny sculpture with carrot vase on head, whimsical animal clay sculptural vase

    “Carrot Top Rabbit” – Ceramic Vase

    $186.00
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  • orange and white handmade ceramic vase of cat

    “Tabby Cat” – Ceramic Vase

    $186.00
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  • Ceramic Everyday Goddess Sculpture

    $48.50
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About Amy Goldstein-Rice

When did you first start making your craft?

Once I finished with undergrad I moved back to my hometown, Spartanburg, SC. From there I set up my studio on the front porch of a rental house and had my kiln hooked up in my fathers garage. From that point, “where I go my studio goes.” It’s a real hazel to move a clay studio. I should know.  It’s been eight times so far. I just moved to Tryon, NC.

What do you draw inspiration from? 

From My Everyday; I see myself creating work that deals with how I react and respond to the world around me. I use ceramic forms of animals and the human figures as a vessel that evolves into a humorous expression filled with emotion with a witty edge.

Imagery of animals had its beginnings with the birth of my son (Ryan). It was then during those early years, that our house was filled with pull toys and spinning tops. We  (Frank and I) put down the classic to read the nonsensical stories of Dr. Seuss. We discovered the animated world of “Where the Wild Things Go”. I was immersed in the wee world of children. Thus my love of story telling grew. I worked imagery into a narrative. Using the language of whimsy and pop culture.  Interweaving folktales and animal imagery into my own myths.  Just as fairy tales speak through fantastical creatures of deeper and sometime darker truths, I would use the language of whimsy to let the viewer laugh, through the tears. I like to imagine that my clay sculpture is infused with an emotional stance that has humorous edge.

How do you incorporate flowers into your work?

I wanted to keep with my sculptural style changing the rabbits and cat into a vessel that holds a flower.

When did you join the Guild and why?  / What is your favorite part of being a Guild Member?

2004 ? The fair, its the best way to meet customers face to face, show your passion for clay and exhibit with an exceptional group of artist and craftsmen.

Do you teach workshops?

I no longer teach but my teaching career stared when I joined the staff at the Spartanburg Arts Council as their artist in residents. During my years with the Arts Council, I conducted adult pottery classes, promoted the visual arts through the visiting arts program in public schools and established the pottery studio for the Spartanburg Arts Association’s Art School. I continued teaching applied arts at the Spartanburg Day School for 12 years. All through the years, my focus has been ceramics. .

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