Let’s Tango – Wooden Sculpture by Keith Holt

Keith Holt

**SOLD**

This piece is part of WOODn’t You Like to Know, the current exhibition in the Folk Art Center’s Main Gallery.

Description

This piece is part of WOODn’t You Like to Know, the current exhibition in the Folk Art Center’s Main Gallery.  This exceptional selection of wooden sculpture has been curated by John Hill, the exhibition coordinator of the American Association of Woodturners.

  • Ash, dyes, milk paint, Danish oil and lacquer; band-saw work, turned, carved
  • 18.5” x 12” x 12”
  • This piece has been SOLD
  • Made in 2019

“I have enjoyed beautiful movement all my life. As a gymnast and as a gymnastics coach for over twenty years, I explored creating movement with the body. In addition, I was blessed to work with hundreds of children and experience their joyful spirit.  Now, as an artist, I love to create flowing movements and joyful expressions through my forms. The challenge of my art is to find the fewest lines in a piece to convey a feeling, while utilizing attributes of the materials towards this goal. Though my life in the gymnastics world has molded my view of form, it is my goal to have each piece have a life of its own.”

Keith Holt’s woodworking is the culmination of a lifelong pursuit of art. He studied fine art at college and with a number or private teachers. He left the art world to pursue the art of movement in gymnastics; this led to owning and running his own gymnastics center. In the Baltimore area. As Keith learned the woodworking and woodturning processes in 2003, he began to realize their artistic potentials. Over the  years, he has refined his technique and sought new artistic visions in wood and other materials. His experience with the beautiful movement encountered in gymnastics has been incorporated into his sculpting. Keith also uses his observations of universal truths / spiritual truths that have influenced his life. This seamless expression of inner spirit through outer form is the goal of every piece he makes. In early 2010, he left the gymnastics world to pursue his art full time.