Nurture – Wooden Sculpture by Michael Hosaluk

Michael Hosaluk

$3,500.00

This piece is part of WOODn’t You Like to Know, the current exhibition in the Folk Art Center’s Main Gallery.

1 in stock

Description

This piece is part of WOODn’t You Like to Know, the current exhibition in the Folk Art Center’s Main Gallery.  This exceptional selection of wooden sculpture has been curated by John Hill, the exhibition coordinator of the American Association of Woodturners.

  •  Maple; turned, carved, decorated
  • 16″ x 12″ x 10″
  • This piece will be shipped after the close of the show on September 22, 2019
  • Shipping cost TBD
  • Made in 2017

“My love of woodworking is not only for the beauty and mystery of the material, but in the inventing of new techniques and processes to create objects.  The materials I use relate to the objects I make. At times a piece of salvaged wood will become a starting point of design. Other times, a design will call for a piece of wood with incredible grain. Using plain wood like birch allows me to approach the objects as a three dimensional canvas. Here I can apply a variety of surface design techniques to express an idea. My work tells stories from my life, places I’ve been, people I’ve met, architecture, our environment. These stories are interwoven into the objects I create. Craft goes beyond the pleasure of our senses and deals not only with aesthetics, but social and ideological lives.”

Michael Hosaluk is recognized internationally and in Canada as one of the world’s most creative wood “turners”. Born in 1954 in Invernay, Saskatchewan, Hosaluk is self taught.  Hosaluk’s work has been exhibited throughout Canada, in Europe, China, Japan, Australia and the United States. Hosaluk’s pieces can be found in the permanent collections of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Buckingham Palace; Zhao Xiu, Governor of Jilin Province, China; Idemitsu Corporation, Tokyo; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Detroit Institute of Arts; Yale University Art Gallery; Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Royal Ontario Museum.