"Tortoise" - Southern Highland Craft Guild Skip to content

The 75th Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands takes place July 21-24 & Oct 13-16 at Harrah's Cherokee Center-Asheville. $10 tickets are available online and at the door.

For more visit craftguild.org/craftfair. Sign up for our newsletter for the latest updates.

“Tortoise”

Kelly Riek

$7,800.00

“Tortoise” Coverlet by Haywood Community College Graduate Kelly Rick. On display at the Folk Art Center, NC.

This piece will remain on exhibit in the Main Gallery of the Folk Art Center until the close of the show on September 7, 2022. Shipping cost will be determined at that time.

  • 104” x 96” x 1 3/4”
  • Linen and wool
  • Handwoven
  • Handsewn
  • Made in NC

**All sales are final**

In stock

Description

Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition 2022. On display at the Folk Art Center May 21 – September 7.

“While considering what I wanted to explore in my piece for this exhibit I found myself gravitating towards images of disintegrating textiles – specifically remnants of historical fabrics preserved in the collections of museums – fragments of fragile cloth mounted on archival boards for their protection. The undesigned and organic nature of stains and abrasions makes such a lovely contrast to the very intentional and linear construction of a textile. Complex interactions between positive and negative space develop as pattern fields shift and mutate with fading and deterioration. Time adds an unrepeatable character. These are qualities I sought to approximate in “Tortoise”, through both low-water immersion dyeing of my linen warp and weft and devoré burnout of selected areas of wool pattern weft.” – Kelly Riek

 

 

Artist: Kelly Riek

Description

Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition 2022. On display at the Folk Art Center May 21 – September 7.

“While considering what I wanted to explore in my piece for this exhibit I found myself gravitating towards images of disintegrating textiles – specifically remnants of historical fabrics preserved in the collections of museums – fragments of fragile cloth mounted on archival boards for their protection. The undesigned and organic nature of stains and abrasions makes such a lovely contrast to the very intentional and linear construction of a textile. Complex interactions between positive and negative space develop as pattern fields shift and mutate with fading and deterioration. Time adds an unrepeatable character. These are qualities I sought to approximate in “Tortoise”, through both low-water immersion dyeing of my linen warp and weft and devoré burnout of selected areas of wool pattern weft.” – Kelly Riek

 

 

You may also like…

Scroll To Top