"Throw My Stick" Sculpture - Southern Highland Craft Guild Skip to content

“Throw My Stick” Sculpture

Amy Goldstein-Rice

$338.00

“Throw My Stick” Sculpture. Amy Goldstein-Rice creates this whimsical dog sculpture by altering wheel-thrown shapes and adding hand-built pieces to create the animal form. Sculpting is done almost entirely by hand, using modest tools. Surface decoration is achieved when textural marks are infused with layers of engobe, slip, and underglaze. Currently on display at the “Natural Direction” focus gallery at the Folk Art Center, NC.

  • 14″ x 8″ x 6″
  • Earthenware
  • Plastic eyes
  • Made in NC

 

In stock

Description

On the second level of the Folk Art Center, “Natural Direction” is on display in the Focus Gallery now until Feb 15, 2022. This exhibit features five Guild Members: Hollis Fouts – wall textile, Kathleen Doyle and Thomas Reardon – jewelry, Sue Grier – clay, Tina and Bill Collison – wood, Amy Goldstein Rice – clay.

“I see clay as inventive. It’s a rich medium that offers a generous and tireless play of possibilities. Clay allows expression of the whimsical and the symbolic, sometimes simultaneously.”

Amy Goldstein-Rice is drawn to the idea of animal as messenger, interweaving her ideals about her life with classical folk tales and animal imagery of the Native Americans. The animals become talismans that represent or tell a story of some little obsession, vivid dream, or concerns of the world–with a grain of satire. This has been a starting point.

Description

On the second level of the Folk Art Center, “Natural Direction” is on display in the Focus Gallery now until Feb 15, 2022. This exhibit features five Guild Members: Hollis Fouts – wall textile, Kathleen Doyle and Thomas Reardon – jewelry, Sue Grier – clay, Tina and Bill Collison – wood, Amy Goldstein Rice – clay.

“I see clay as inventive. It’s a rich medium that offers a generous and tireless play of possibilities. Clay allows expression of the whimsical and the symbolic, sometimes simultaneously.”

Amy Goldstein-Rice is drawn to the idea of animal as messenger, interweaving her ideals about her life with classical folk tales and animal imagery of the Native Americans. The animals become talismans that represent or tell a story of some little obsession, vivid dream, or concerns of the world–with a grain of satire. This has been a starting point.

You may also like…

Scroll To Top