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Blue Dyed Ash Wood Bowl with Bark Edge #30752

Bill and Tina Collison

$250.00

This piece was made from a recently felled Ash tree in Northeast Tennessee.  The wood was cut to size and rounded into a “blank”, then mounted on the lathe and turned into a bowl or hollow form. The natural bark edge of the tree was preserved on this bowl and Dyed Black. After sanding, the finished piece on display required a multiple step process. Several applications of dye are needed for a consistent color and then a single coat of finish lacquer seals the dye.  Next, English white liming wax was applied, then rubbed off, to highlight the soft grain.  Several more coats of lacquer are then applied and buffed with a German violin polish that completes the job.

  • 12” x 11” x 5 1/2”

In stock

Description

Bill’s early days in his father’s workshop and Tina’s interest in decoy carving fueled their interest in wood as the medium for their endeavors. They both view wood as strong, solid, substantial, and lasting…all great qualities as a medium for artwork. Bill turns burls, natural edged bowls and platters; Tina creates the surface embellishments by carving, piercing, burning and coloring designs on the turned pieces, moving the work from high quality craft into Art.

A piece of wood on the lathe serves as a blank canvas would for a painter. The various chisels and embellishment tools are the pigments and brushes. Unlike the painter or potter who may rework a flaw in their work, working with wood on the lathe is a one-way process. Disappointments or errors in form or technique are usually final; that piece finds its way to the “designer firewood pile.”

Bill and Tina Collison

Wood has a mysterious quality as a medium that fuels our curiosity as artists. Each piece is like opening a thriller novel where the plot is only revealed in the final pages. Solving these mysteries provides us pleasure and inspiration and is the driving force in our work.

Description

Bill’s early days in his father’s workshop and Tina’s interest in decoy carving fueled their interest in wood as the medium for their endeavors. They both view wood as strong, solid, substantial, and lasting…all great qualities as a medium for artwork. Bill turns burls, natural edged bowls and platters; Tina creates the surface embellishments by carving, piercing, burning and coloring designs on the turned pieces, moving the work from high quality craft into Art.

A piece of wood on the lathe serves as a blank canvas would for a painter. The various chisels and embellishment tools are the pigments and brushes. Unlike the painter or potter who may rework a flaw in their work, working with wood on the lathe is a one-way process. Disappointments or errors in form or technique are usually final; that piece finds its way to the “designer firewood pile.”

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