Cotton African Cotton Face Mask | Southern Highland Craft Guild Skip to content

African Cotton Face Mask

Teresa Hays

$15.00

Handmade face mask made from directly sourced African cottons.  Reversible, machine washable, and include a metal nose piece to ensure a snug, but comfortable fit around the nose.

  • 2 layers of high thread count cotton fabric
  • Machine wash and dry after use
  • Made in NC
Clear

Description

Since the beginning of April 2020, Shimai artist Teresa Hays has made almost 375 masks.   She has given these masks to her extended family, friends, friends of friends, families of friends, neighbors, and has donated them to front line providers, essential personnel, nursing home staff, and non-profits servicing the homeless and differently abled adults.   While giving and donating masks, her efforts morphed into fundraising efforts, and donations were made to the American Craft Council, CERF, local frontline providers, and causes chosen by recipients.  Teresa will continue to donate masks occasionally, but she is now able to offer them for sale to the general public.

CDC on Homemade Cloth Face Coverings

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

The cloth face coverings recommended by the CDC are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

 

Teresa Hays

I start with white fabric and through layering textile design processes including but not limited to dyeing, printing, silk screening and hand painting, I create richly colored and patterned fabrics for accessories and clothing. All processes including surface design, garment design, and garment construction are completed within my studio. I create with thought and care what I hope are functional, timeless, sustainable garments.

Description

Since the beginning of April 2020, Shimai artist Teresa Hays has made almost 375 masks.   She has given these masks to her extended family, friends, friends of friends, families of friends, neighbors, and has donated them to front line providers, essential personnel, nursing home staff, and non-profits servicing the homeless and differently abled adults.   While giving and donating masks, her efforts morphed into fundraising efforts, and donations were made to the American Craft Council, CERF, local frontline providers, and causes chosen by recipients.  Teresa will continue to donate masks occasionally, but she is now able to offer them for sale to the general public.

CDC on Homemade Cloth Face Coverings

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

The cloth face coverings recommended by the CDC are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

 

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